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Wildcat Exterminating Blog

By 7016612261 10 Apr, 2017

Summertime means picnics and hiking and swimming, and – around here – hunting for a cool place to rest in the heat of the afternoon. Whew! Tucson heat can be rough. I know I’m grateful to spend a little of my time inside with the air conditioner cranked up high!

For our customers, summertime can also bring a host of growing *things* that may create an issue around the home or business. Fortunately, Wildcat is here and happy to help! Here are some tips with dealing with the ongoing issue of bees:


Most bee calls come to us because the client is concerned with safety matters. That’s a good reason to seek professional help– bees can certainly pose a problem with safety. When you come across bees, your safest course of action is to stay clear of the area where they are flying or gathering.


When should you call a professional to help with bees?

First, remember that bees are natural, and part of their life cycle (and the life cycle of many other living things) is pollination. When you see bees, commonly they are simply looking for a place to pollinate, and when the sun falls in the evening they will go on their way – I call these visiting bees. If you have flowers, a pool, or a fountain, you will attract visiting bees during the day, and they are only there to visit - not to build a hive. Pollinating bees, and bees looking for water are not necessarily cause for alarm; but remember to keep your safe distance.

If visiting bees are interfering with your life, or pose a health concern with your pets or children, a pest professional can aid in minimizing their presence on your property. If the attractant is something you’re willing to part with (for example, shutting off a fountain for the summer months), that may likely be a good place to start.

While we can assist you with minimizing visitor bees, we mostly address hives that have formed, small and large. Once you have a hive, the bees are unlikely to move on naturally. They are making a home, and making honey in that location – and that is where the queen lives. If you have a hive on your house, you want to have it removed as soon as possible. Why? In addition to the issue of the bees themselves, as a hive is built up over time inside the wall or ceiling of a building, the honey can slowly cause rot in the structure because of the moisture it holds.

 

So, if you see bees practice the WILDCAT Way:

W atch: Keep an eye on their location, and keep a safe distance

I gnorance is not bliss: Pay close enough attention to decipher if you have a hive or a visiting bee

L eave the bees alone: Don’t patronize or irritate them, it can be unsafe for you and those nearby

D angerous: Do not attempt to kill off the bees yourself. It can create a dangerous situation for you and those nearby

C hange your plans: If you have a swarm of bees where you planned to be today, you may need to make new plans to stay safe

A lert: Tell other people nearby about the bees you’ve seen so they can keep a safe distance, as well

T reat: Call a professional to treat a hive situation, or to address visiting bees who outstay their welcome

By 7016612261 01 Mar, 2017
Since this is the first official blog, I want to just take a moment to give a quick greeting from the family over here at Wildcat Exterminating!  By adding this blog to our website, we hope to accomplish a few important things:  to help educate our clients, allow your family to get to know our family a little better, and hopefully have a little fun in the process!

Me - I'm Kim.  I'll be overseeing the blog.  What does that mean?  Most likely, you'll be hearing from me most of the time!  That said, I fully intend to recruit article ideas from our whole staff, and get some "guest articles" from our owners, Chuck Stephens and Cody Stephens.

Now, on to our topic for today!  

9 Ways to Prevent Infestations Before They Start

Now, we  are here to help you guys get rid of pest control problems - and to help you prevent them!  Of course, we have services that act preventative (both chemical and non-chemical), but there are always things you can be doing to make our services even more effective - or to keep you from an infestation to begin with.

1. Move your furniture and appliances - we recommend moving furniture and appliances at least twice per year. Pull these items out and do a thorough cleaning under and behind. All these stagnant areas accumulate dust and crumbs (or grease and grime when it comes to the stove): that plus the darkness of its shadow makes it a great hiding place for pests you don't want. Keeping it clean and even the movement itself makes this area less desirable to your not so friendly little friends.

2. Maintain the weather strip on your doors - weather stripping is a seal against the heat and cold, but also against creepy crawlies. By checking these seals annually (and replacing as needed based on wear and tear), you close off that critter super highway.

3. Landscaping is more than just for beauty (part one) - weeds and low lying brush are a haven for bugs and rodents. Keeping your weeds to a minimum and trimming plants up a few inches from the ground removes these appealing nest areas and encourages these pesky creatures further from your home.

4. Landscaping is more than just for beauty (part two) - plants that touch the exterior wall of your home create a yummy avenue for termites to access the home, and can also allow rodents to crawl more easily to your roof or attic access. Keep plants trimmed back from the house, including tree limbs that might touch the roof, or keeping vines on trellises instead of your siding.

5. Do a walk around - when it comes to bees it is best to catch their hives early before they cause problems. In the spring and summer make sure you see all four exterior sides of your hour home each week, and seek assistance early if beehives discovered. This will help keep your home and yard safe and keep pest control costs lower than if the hive is allowed time to grow.  And for safety purposes, please do not treat a bee hive yourself or mess with these guys.

6. Checking under the kids beds is not just for monsters - we love our little guys, but sometimes they can be a mess! Many times ant infestations start up (and grow) because they found an excellent food source: that stale grilled cheese under Junior's bed. Once a week, take a glance under the little one's bed and clear out any food items / vacuum up the crumbs. This can save you headaches and pest control costs.

7. Put away yard tools strategically - it doesn't take much dew or rain to gather in shovel left laying on the ground, or fill up a wheelbarrow; and these stagnant water sources can encourage mosquito breeding. If you store your yard tools outside --  stand shovels upright or hang, and turn wheelbarrows upside down to prevent unneeded water accumulation.

8. Stack firewood away from the house - if you have a fireplace, keep that firewood away from the edge of your home. This encourages termites near the structure, in addition to being an ideal nesting place for scorpions.

9. Remember the grease and grime I mentioned in number one? Behind the stove is a great place for roaches to find a feast. A single drop of grease will feed a roach for quite some time. If you notice a spill occur to the side or behind the stove, don't wait for your twice a year cleaning, go ahead and take care right away. The time you take to do this can save a lot of frustration and cost when it comes to roaches.

-Kim M.

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Wildcat Exterminating Blog

By 7016612261 10 Apr, 2017

Summertime means picnics and hiking and swimming, and – around here – hunting for a cool place to rest in the heat of the afternoon. Whew! Tucson heat can be rough. I know I’m grateful to spend a little of my time inside with the air conditioner cranked up high!

For our customers, summertime can also bring a host of growing *things* that may create an issue around the home or business. Fortunately, Wildcat is here and happy to help! Here are some tips with dealing with the ongoing issue of bees:


Most bee calls come to us because the client is concerned with safety matters. That’s a good reason to seek professional help– bees can certainly pose a problem with safety. When you come across bees, your safest course of action is to stay clear of the area where they are flying or gathering.


When should you call a professional to help with bees?

First, remember that bees are natural, and part of their life cycle (and the life cycle of many other living things) is pollination. When you see bees, commonly they are simply looking for a place to pollinate, and when the sun falls in the evening they will go on their way – I call these visiting bees. If you have flowers, a pool, or a fountain, you will attract visiting bees during the day, and they are only there to visit - not to build a hive. Pollinating bees, and bees looking for water are not necessarily cause for alarm; but remember to keep your safe distance.

If visiting bees are interfering with your life, or pose a health concern with your pets or children, a pest professional can aid in minimizing their presence on your property. If the attractant is something you’re willing to part with (for example, shutting off a fountain for the summer months), that may likely be a good place to start.

While we can assist you with minimizing visitor bees, we mostly address hives that have formed, small and large. Once you have a hive, the bees are unlikely to move on naturally. They are making a home, and making honey in that location – and that is where the queen lives. If you have a hive on your house, you want to have it removed as soon as possible. Why? In addition to the issue of the bees themselves, as a hive is built up over time inside the wall or ceiling of a building, the honey can slowly cause rot in the structure because of the moisture it holds.

 

So, if you see bees practice the WILDCAT Way:

W atch: Keep an eye on their location, and keep a safe distance

I gnorance is not bliss: Pay close enough attention to decipher if you have a hive or a visiting bee

L eave the bees alone: Don’t patronize or irritate them, it can be unsafe for you and those nearby

D angerous: Do not attempt to kill off the bees yourself. It can create a dangerous situation for you and those nearby

C hange your plans: If you have a swarm of bees where you planned to be today, you may need to make new plans to stay safe

A lert: Tell other people nearby about the bees you’ve seen so they can keep a safe distance, as well

T reat: Call a professional to treat a hive situation, or to address visiting bees who outstay their welcome

By 7016612261 01 Mar, 2017
Since this is the first official blog, I want to just take a moment to give a quick greeting from the family over here at Wildcat Exterminating!  By adding this blog to our website, we hope to accomplish a few important things:  to help educate our clients, allow your family to get to know our family a little better, and hopefully have a little fun in the process!

Me - I'm Kim.  I'll be overseeing the blog.  What does that mean?  Most likely, you'll be hearing from me most of the time!  That said, I fully intend to recruit article ideas from our whole staff, and get some "guest articles" from our owners, Chuck Stephens and Cody Stephens.

Now, on to our topic for today!  

9 Ways to Prevent Infestations Before They Start

Now, we  are here to help you guys get rid of pest control problems - and to help you prevent them!  Of course, we have services that act preventative (both chemical and non-chemical), but there are always things you can be doing to make our services even more effective - or to keep you from an infestation to begin with.

1. Move your furniture and appliances - we recommend moving furniture and appliances at least twice per year. Pull these items out and do a thorough cleaning under and behind. All these stagnant areas accumulate dust and crumbs (or grease and grime when it comes to the stove): that plus the darkness of its shadow makes it a great hiding place for pests you don't want. Keeping it clean and even the movement itself makes this area less desirable to your not so friendly little friends.

2. Maintain the weather strip on your doors - weather stripping is a seal against the heat and cold, but also against creepy crawlies. By checking these seals annually (and replacing as needed based on wear and tear), you close off that critter super highway.

3. Landscaping is more than just for beauty (part one) - weeds and low lying brush are a haven for bugs and rodents. Keeping your weeds to a minimum and trimming plants up a few inches from the ground removes these appealing nest areas and encourages these pesky creatures further from your home.

4. Landscaping is more than just for beauty (part two) - plants that touch the exterior wall of your home create a yummy avenue for termites to access the home, and can also allow rodents to crawl more easily to your roof or attic access. Keep plants trimmed back from the house, including tree limbs that might touch the roof, or keeping vines on trellises instead of your siding.

5. Do a walk around - when it comes to bees it is best to catch their hives early before they cause problems. In the spring and summer make sure you see all four exterior sides of your hour home each week, and seek assistance early if beehives discovered. This will help keep your home and yard safe and keep pest control costs lower than if the hive is allowed time to grow.  And for safety purposes, please do not treat a bee hive yourself or mess with these guys.

6. Checking under the kids beds is not just for monsters - we love our little guys, but sometimes they can be a mess! Many times ant infestations start up (and grow) because they found an excellent food source: that stale grilled cheese under Junior's bed. Once a week, take a glance under the little one's bed and clear out any food items / vacuum up the crumbs. This can save you headaches and pest control costs.

7. Put away yard tools strategically - it doesn't take much dew or rain to gather in shovel left laying on the ground, or fill up a wheelbarrow; and these stagnant water sources can encourage mosquito breeding. If you store your yard tools outside --  stand shovels upright or hang, and turn wheelbarrows upside down to prevent unneeded water accumulation.

8. Stack firewood away from the house - if you have a fireplace, keep that firewood away from the edge of your home. This encourages termites near the structure, in addition to being an ideal nesting place for scorpions.

9. Remember the grease and grime I mentioned in number one? Behind the stove is a great place for roaches to find a feast. A single drop of grease will feed a roach for quite some time. If you notice a spill occur to the side or behind the stove, don't wait for your twice a year cleaning, go ahead and take care right away. The time you take to do this can save a lot of frustration and cost when it comes to roaches.

-Kim M.

e���|F2�.d�
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